Category:NCAAF
Posted on: January 20, 2012 2:01 pm
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Friday Mailbag: Gators ready to make a jump?

Time for the Friday Mailbag. As always, if you have a question, send it to me via Twitter at BFeldmanCBS.

From @cjdyal Is it possible for UF to make a Bama 08 type of jump, where both teams went 7-6 year one? UF returns 10/11 starters on D.


That Bama team had a lot more experience on offense with a very talented and seasoned O-line to lean on and a veteran QB in senior John Parker Wilson. They had 18 starters returning. The other big thing that had going for them was a really experienced coaching staff led by Nick Saban. And keep in mind, even though that Bama team had gone 7-6, all six of those losses were by a TD or less. Of UF's six losses, only two were by a touchdown or less. They were not as competitive and they're younger, both on the field and on the sidelines.

  The Gators should have a very tough defense, as you alluded to, but it's the offense that is the big unknown. It was awful last season and there are major question marks for new OC Brent Pease heading into 2012: Both young QBs are unproven and looked very shaky when they got the chance to play. There is no established tailback to lean on for those young QBs. There is no go-to guy at receiver to count on in the clutch. There is some experience on the O-line and they do have some speed, but this was still a group that was just 105th in the country in total offense. That's why Pease is one of the more intriguing hires of the off-season. There is a talent there but it seems pretty raw. Last season was a rough transition period, where things got worse before they got better. I feel like Pease is a much better fit here than Charlie Weis was.

I expect UF to be improved in 2012, but I wouldn't expect a jump that big from unranked to top six.

From @
DMcCallCU11  Top 5 sleeper teams not on the radar that may make noise in the BCS??

At this point, it's hard to get a great sense of who is "not on the radar" for 2012 and would be deemed a sleeper. I guess you could say anyone not in the SEC, USC, Oregon or Oklahoma might qualify as "a sleeper" these days. My two best sleeper candidates are both newcomers to the Big 12, TCU and WVU (assuming the Mountaineers can shed the Big East this offseason). Both teams were pretty young last season. The Horned Frogs especially so. Both should be explosive on offense. WVU, which just scored 70 on Clemson in the Orange Bowl, figures to be one of the top two or three scoring teams in the country. TCU should pile up points too and will be even better on D.


Three other sleepers who could make noise in the BCS (although I'm just saying could make a BCS bowl, not be a national title contender): BYU - 15 starters back, plus both specialists; FIU - 17 starters back, including 10 on D, lots of speed on offense and winnable non-conference games against Big East and ACC teams; and La. Tech, 14 starters back from a good team; they play in a weakened league and their toughest non-conference games are against a rebuilding Houston team and Virginia.
 
From @SilverCrushBlog What is Notre Dame missing besides stability at QB? It seems like 1988 was 100 years ago. 


Well, that is a very big missing ingredient. If you don't have an elite defense, and I'm talking about an Alabama or LSU-caliber defense or you don't have a very good QB, you can't be a top-five college team. You'd be fortunate to even be a top 15 team. Look at FSU, the Noles had a pretty tough defense, but they had issues at QB and finished No. 23.


When people say "the only difference between us and (so-and-so) is they have a good quarterback and we don't." Well, that's like saying the only difference between that Ferrari and my car is the engine. It is a very big deal. You're not talking about a tight end or a SAM linebacker.



The Irish, despite having a great WR and TE tandem, were shockingly inept in the Red Zone and had way too many meltdowns. That lack of efficiency, much of it goes back to shaky QB play, really holds a team back because it mangles any effort you have to sustain momentum and crush an opponent's will. Now maybe that's change since Tommy Rees/Andrew Hendrix have more experience or Everett Golson is ready to step out or maybe we'll find out that Gunner Kiel is mature enough and talented enough to overtake the others and be The Guy. Until that happens, there is skepticism for a program that hasn't lived up to the hype for a very long time.


Back to the other side of the ball: Notre Dame's defense was improved in 2011, but it's still nowhere near elite. ND's secondary really struggled to make plays on the ball and was still lacking when it came to facing capable offenses (Michigan, USC and Stanford). Beyond that, the Irish have some really athletic players, but not enough of them.


From @
Brentboyles  why is everybody on the band wagon with USC for next year?


I can give you seven very good reasons:


1. They are led by arguably the best QB in college football who has a ton of experience, Matt Barkley.

2. They have the best 1-2 WR tandem in the country, Robert Woods and Marqise Lee.

3. They return their entire back-seven on D that includes their top tacklers who were freshmen in 2011 (Dion Bailey and Hayes Pullard) and perhaps the top two DBs in the Pac-12 in safety T.J. McDonald and CB Nickell Robey.

4. They bring back four starting O-linemen and now actually have some quality depth behind those guys.

5. They return a 1000-yard rusher, Curtis McNeal.

6. They get the two most talented teams on their schedule, Oregon and Notre Dame, in the Coliseum.

7. No team will be hungrier.



From @chrisasims Hey Bruce, here's a question for you: How do you expect Oregon to fare next season without Darron Thomas and LaMichael James?

  As long as Chip Kelly's running the show there, the Ducks should be fine. Despite those players moving on, Oregon is in really good shape. I had them in my Top 5 that I posted the other day
 

Kelly has some very talented people ready to step up. Bryan Bennett is faster and a more accurate passer than Thomas, but lacks his experience while Kenjon Barner, De'Anthony Thomas and a more physical young back, Tra Carson, should ease the loss of James. Another name to remember with the Ducks in 2012 is redshirt freshman QB Marcus Mariota, who has coaches very excited in Eugene. The O-line also should be better.



  From @danielmcfadin How do you think Gus Malzahn's first season at Arkansas State will compare to HughFreeze's?

I don't expect Malzahn to match Freeze's 10-win total this year. ASU lost almost its entire defense and that was a surprisingly solid group that was top 25 in most categories and No. 13 against the run. Malzahn does inherit a good triggerman in Ryan Aplin, who should put up big numbers, but there are probably too many quality guys to replace to expect more than eight wins in Year One, especially when you consider the Red Wolves have to visit Oregon and Nebraska in the first three weeks of the season.
 

From @galdog33  reading Swing Your Sword now...great read so far...do you think Coach Leach can start as fast at WSU as his other stops?

  Thanks! I don't see the Cougars overtaking Oregon in the Pac-12 North this year after finishing in the basement of the division. They were 4-8 in 2011 but were competitive. Paul Wulff certainly did not leave the cupboard bare. Leach walks into a decent situation. They have some good pieces on offense with two talented QBs (Jeff Tuel and Connor Halliday) and one stud WR (Marquess Wilson). The down side: The O-line is very shaky. They were 116th in sacks allowed. They also really struggled on D, ranking 95th in scoring defense.
 
 

Leach, though, never has had a losing season at Tech, and I doubt he has one in his first year at WSU. I'm not sure he can double last year's win total, but I'll be surprised if the Cougars aren't a bowl team. It will be an interesting first month in Pullman. They have a challenging opener against his alma mater, at BYU. After that, they have EWU, at UNLV and Colorado. My hunch is they should be 3-1 when they face Oregon in Seattle.  


From @365ROLLTIDE even though Bama loses a lot, do you think the SEC west will come down to the Bama/LSU game next season? Thanks

I do. While I think Arkansas is a dangerous team and the Hogs get both LSU and Bama at home in 2012, I still feel like they don't have enough big-time guys on defense to win that division. Bama may only return a handful of starters but the Tide gets back the nucleus to perhaps the best O-line in the country and has a proven winner at QB to go with Eddie Lacy, who would've started probably for 100 other teams were it not for Trent Richardson.

  From @mckdaddy1 what kind of gig would Houston Nutt get if/when he gets back into coaching?

Nutt has had a lot of success in his coaching career and is still only in his mid-50s. He won SEC Coach of the Year three times, which is impressive. But it is intriguing where does a guy like this go after his stint at Ole Miss? The broadcast booth? As an assitant to the NFL?

After a great start in Oxford, things fell apart in a huge way with the worst season in school history last year. From what I've been told by sources in Oxford he left a real mess behind. I wouldn't expect Nutt to go from that to land another SEC head coaching job. Maybe next season a Conference USA job opens up or perhaps somewhere in the Sun Belt. I'd be surprised if Nutt took a job as an assistant at a bigger school since he's been a head coach for so long.
Posted on: January 17, 2012 12:42 pm
Edited on: January 17, 2012 2:20 pm
 

Tuesday Top 10: The Early Preseason Top 10

Since this is the first Tuesday Top 10 list of 2012, I figured I'd start with the topic that'll get broached the most between now and September: my preseason top 10. My colleague Brett McMurphy wrote about his too-early rankings last week, but some things have cleared up with more top underclassmen announcing their NFL draft intentions since then. Anyhow, here goes:

1. USC: The Trojans finished 2011 with a bang, ending Oregon's long home-winning streak and thumping rival UCLA. Better still, they were the biggest winner in the NFL underclassmen derby with star QB Matt Barkley opting to remain for his senior season. Yes, they lost stud LT Matt Kalil, but the rest of the O-line, which was pretty young last year, is back and now it's a pretty deep group. Barkley also has the best 1-2 receiving tandem in college football: rising junior Robert Woods is an All-American, and there are some inside the Trojan program who think rising sophomore Marqise Lee is already surpassing him. Curtis McNeal, a 1000-yard rusher, returns, so does the entire back seven, including standout DBs T.J. McDonald and Nickell Robey and their top two tacklers Hayes Pullard and Dion Bailey, both freshmen in 2011. The D-line has some guys to replace, but does return three players with starting experience and a bunch of blue-chippers who redshirted. The schedule also breaks well: Oregon and Notre Dame, the two most talented teams they'll face, both have to visit the Coliseum. I realize that it probably seems foolish to list anyone other than an SEC team in the No. 1 spot, but if there's any college QB up for such an undertaking, it's Barkley, and he's got the weapons to pull it off.
 
2. LSU:
I was tempted to have Alabama in this slot after the way the Tide dominated the BCS title game and especially after seeing how sharp A.J. McCarron was last week, but the Tigers were younger and have more key guys back. They also get 'Bama in Baton Rouge in 2012. As I wrote the other day, there is a lot of enthusiasm about Zach Mettenberger taking over the team, spurring the staff to open things up more. They're going to be loaded at RB, and despite the loss of DT Michael Brockers and CB Mo Claiborne, the Tigers are still stacked at both positions. The youngsters to keep an eye on: DT Anthony Johnson and redshirt freshman CB Jalen Collins.

3. Alabama:
Nick Saban will have a legit shot to win his third BCS title in four seasons because he'll still have a stellar O-line and a proven QB (McCarron). Eddie Lacy is also ready to be a feature back. They will have to replace most of the defense, but there is plenty of talent ready to break out in the front seven, led by powerhouse DE Jesse Williams, who is still raw but an offseason of polish should make him a nightmare for SEC offenses. LB Xzavier Dickson is also a guy that has Tide coaches buzzing after a nice freshman year. They'll have a nice test in the opener in Texas against a good Michigan team. The bad news is they do have to go on the road to face the other two heavyweights in the conference: LSU and at Arkansas.

4. Oklahoma: Landry Jones is back after what had to be a disappointing season given expectations going into 2011. It certainly didn't help that OU lost its leading rusher (Dom Whaley) and star WR (Ryan Broyles) to injury near midseason. Jones has a good group of WRs led by Kenny Stills and Jaz Reynolds. They do have some sizable holes in the front seven to fill, but defensive coordinator Mike Stoops is back and that is a very good thing for the defense. The younger Stoops also has a lot of talent to work with in the secondary.

5. Oregon:
Even though it was a stunner that QB Darron Thomas bolted for the NFL, his understudy Bryan Bennett is even a bit faster and a more accurate passer, and he showed some of those skills in midseason when he was forced into action. Bennett still doesn't have the seasoning in this system, but that should come, although don't rule out redshirt freshman Marcus Mariota, a raw 6-foot-4 QB who may have even better tools for this scheme. LaMichael James also is gone, but with De'Anthony Thomas and Kenjon Barner, Chip Kelly still has so much speed at his disposal, you still feel sorry for rival defenses. The interior of the O-line returns intact, which is key, and safety John Boyett is back, along with LB Kiko Alonso, one of the stars of the Rose Bowl win over Wisconsin, to anchor the D. Interesting opener against Gus Malzahn's Ark State squad, but the real game to circle is when the Ducks visit USC Nov. 3.

6. West Virginia:
After a tumultuous year, the Mountaineers kicked off 2012 in grand fashion, obliterating Clemson in the Orange Bowl by hanging 70 on the Tigers. The scarier thought is that QB Geno Smith and the bulk of those skill guys are not only back, but now they'll have added reps to get even better at the timing of Dana Holgorsen's scheme. Most of the O-line returns, and that includes standout Josh Jenkins, a three-year starter on the line who had to redshirt the 2011 season. Look out Big 12 (assuming WVU is cleared for take off in time). If not, brace yourself Big East because an ornery bunch of Mountaineers probably will be trying to hang 100 on everybody in that league on the way out the door. The thing keeping this group from being top-five caliber: WVU's D has some very good players to replace and respected DC Jeff Casteel also is gone, off to re-join Rich Rodriguez at Arizona. Still, the offense is so explosive they should be able to outscore almost everyone they face. Almost.

7. Georgia:
The Dawgs won the SEC East thanks to an improved defense but still really didn't beat anyone of the caliber that you have to beat to show they're ready to overtake the powers of the SEC West. Losing to Michigan State in the bowl game didn't help either. However, there is still a lot of reason for optimism here. The defense returns almost everyone; QB Aaron Murray is very good; young WR Malcolm Mitchell is a budding star. Isaiah Crowell looks like he could be too if he can mature. The kicking game does have to be overhauled though. Maybe the best news of all is that Mark Richt's team has about as manageable a schedule as an SEC team can have, avoiding the top three teams of the SEC West and opening with four of its first five at home.

8. Arkansas:
Bobby Petrino gets back star RB Knile Davis to go with Tyler Wilson, his gifted QB coming off a terrific first season. The defense, which has been shaky for awhile, has some very good players it must replace. And there is a new DC running the show. I do like that the Hogs get both Bama and LSU at home this year, but it's the D that still has me skeptical.

9.  TCU:
The Horned Frogs make another conference move. This one is their biggest yet, over to the Big 12 to rejoin some old friends. No doubt it is a step up in competition. Do they have enough quality depth to handle the attrition that figures to come with that? Well see, but I think Gary Patterson's program is ready for the move. In 2011, the Horned Frogs had as many key freshmen and sophomores contributing as just about anyone. QB Casey Pachall had a very good first season replacing Andy Dalton. Now, the question is, can Pachall take the next step as a leader to elevate this team even higher and do all of the detail stuff in preparation that Dalton was so good at? The physical tools are certainly there. He also has a good supporting cast led by standout WR Josh Boyce and a deep group of RBs. LB Tanner Brock is back from injury to anchor the defense along with big-play DE Stansly Maponga and a more mature secondary.

10. FSU:
After the underwhelming season the Noles had following all of the hype they had entering 2011, I swore I wouldn't give in and allow myself to rank them in the top 10, so I had them at 11. Yet, here they are. This is something we in the media need to realize: The Noles are your preseason dirty addiction. They are that ex-girlfriend who still can put it together and show up at the other side of the bar and catch your eye. And then you give in, and not long after you feel foolish for it. Anyhow. Jimbo Fisher should have a nasty defense, led by a ferocious D-line. The O-line will be better with much-needed experience. Same for QB E.J. Manuel and a young group of receivers. They do have to go to Va. Tech this year and get WVU at home.  Just Missed the Cut: Michigan, South Carolina, Ohio State, K-State, Michigan State.




Posted on: January 13, 2012 1:37 pm
Edited on: January 13, 2012 7:55 pm
 

Friday Mailbag: Mettenberger's Maserati

Time for the Friday mailbag. As always, send your questions to me via Twitter at BFeldmanCBS.

From @PatrickSmith45  I keep hearing how good Zach Mettenberger of LSU is. If he was that good wouldn't he have pushed for playing time this past year?

The vibe around LSU right now is really, really intriguing. The Tigers were so close to punctuating one of the great seasons by a team, but then get dominated by Alabama in their own backyard. LSU's offense was atrocious. Before the game, whenever someone asked me where LSU would rank with the all-time great teams, I tempered my answer because for as outstanding as they were on defense and special teams, their QB play was nowhere near that level, and on Monday night, it really showed.
 
That said, almost everyone I talked to last week sounded convinced the Tigers were in the midst of a great run considering that they have so many key guys in the program who are freshmen and sophomores. They had 16 players on the two-deep, including seven starters who were sophs or younger. People knew they'd likely lose Mo Claiborne, their superb CB, early to the NFL. Both QBs were playing their last game Monday as well, but you have to wonder if that's such a bad thing given how the showing in the BCS title game. Jordan Jefferson looked completely lost and his back-up Jarrett Lee didn't even inspire enough confidence in his coaches to bail them out when things looked so bleak.

No one has ever questioned one-time Georgia QB Zach Mettenberger's arm, and after a season at Butler County CC in Kansas, where he had a 32-4 TD-INT ratio, the expectations around the 6-6, 230-pounder only grew. Many of the people inside the program are sold. 

I spoke to Mettenberger and his teammates a lot a few days ago about how LSU goes forward after the BCS game.  Mettenberger said he'd hoped he could've getting a shot at the starting QB job in 2011, but "Coach Miles didn't see it that way," he said. "It was tough at first but I couldn't get upset as long you're winning."

Mettenberger said he could hardly wait for Tuesday (the day after the BCS title game) because "that's when it's my team.

It's gonna be like getting a Maserati when you turn 16. I really think our offense can be special."

Obviously, the Tigers offense looked anything but special against Alabama the other night. Give a lot of credit to the Tide for that, but also there has been plenty of finger-pointing going on in the state of Louisiana. And, if you follow (former?) LSU WR Russell Shepard on Twitter, you see it's not just fans and media (and parents of Tiger players) doing it. Maybe Mettenberger will instill enough faith in his coaches to change that.

Listening to WR Odell Beckham Jr., one of those gifted young players in the program, that is the hope. "Me and Zach always talk about next year," Beckham said last Friday. "Zach wants to break a lot of records. 
 

"One of the things I really about him is he's not afraid to take a risk. He also really does have a cannon for an arm."

Mettenberger said he's learned to become more of a passer than just a thrower. "I used to 'juice' everything." He also said he's realized he has to be quicker with his decisions thanks to his time on the Tigers practice field this year. "If you're a split-second too late on a timing route, (Claiborne and Tyrann Mathieu) are gonna jump it."
 
As for the off-field issues Mettenberger had at Georgia, he said he's "changed my ways of life. You gotta learn to grow up."

We'll see if he is the answer for LSU in 2012. If not, there's dual-threat redshirt freshman Jerrard Randall, who Beckham says has an even stronger arm than Mettenberger, and blue-chip recruit Gunnar Kiel, arguably the No. 1 QB prospect in the country.

From @BruCam87 What can we expect out of Mora and UCLA next year? The talent level seems to be higher than any PAC 12 South team except SC. 

That's been the problem with the Bruins over the past two, three, 10 years or so. The talent "seems" pretty high. They have loaded up on guys who look the part, but they've gotten bogged down by landing too many guys who simply don't love football and aren't as competitive as you need to have an elite program. 

When I visited with Jim Mora a few weeks back he told me he was determined to make this a tougher team. If that's Mission No. 1, that will help right away, but a lot of that also will come back to recruiting and bringing in tougher, hungrier kids. 

What you had in 2011 was a team that was really mediocre on both sides of the ball. I suspect new OC Noel Mazzone will improve the offense because his scheme will be a better fit to the talent than the pistol has been. It'll also help getting back stud LT Xavier Su'a-Filo from the LDS mission after two years away. This program has been so thin on quality O-linemen and Big X is the best that has been on that campus in a decade. And I do agree with you that, given all of the transition in the Pac-12 South, you won't have to be a top 25 team to finish second in that division.

From @hanleyf6 Sal Sunseri has accepted DC job at TN. Why leave Bama? Lots of uncertainty with Dooley's status and major rebuilding job. 

Sunseri's already won BCS titles as an assistant at Bama, and while he's well-regarded as a recruiter, if he can help spark the Vols' resurgence after a dreadful 2011 at a time when that program seems in disarray, his stock will sky-rocket. Even though, there is increasing speculation that if Derek Dooley has another season like he did in 2011 or even close to as bad, he won't be the coach at UT in 2013, keep in mind that Sunseri is getting a reported three-year deal that'll be worth almost $2.5 million. There is stability in that.

On the back side of Sunseri's decision is this: if he stays at Bama, Nick Saban gets most of the credit and Tide DC Kirby Smart gets basically what's left over. By leaving, Sunseri is positioning himself for a much larger spotlight.

From Irishsox05 Is college football ever going to move in the hash marks to match the NFL?  

Interesting question. Never really thought about it. The differing hash marks affect so much of the game in terms of scheming and the kinds of plays people run (wide-side versus boundary). It's also a big consideration for defensive "landmarks" for things such as plotting out coverage areas with the Cover-2, etc. 
  My hunch is the NCAA sticks with what they have because they'd like to keep things as unique for college and traditional as they can, rather than make another stop just to be more like the pros.

From @PaulPabst If we moved to a plus-one or playoff, best case scenario ... which season would it start?


It would start in the 2014 season with the Plus-One (playoff) games taking place in January of 2015.

From @RedKirby What's your prediction for Tx Tech next year? 

My guess is the Red Raiders will make a bowl game in 2012 after missing out this past season. Seth Doege is back at QB. He had an inconsistent year as a first-time starter, but he figures to be better with another year of seasoning. Getting RB Eric Stephens back after missing half the season with a knee injury also will help a bunch. It'll also be interesting to see what they can get from a crew of WRs who didn't play in 2011: Derek Edwards, Tyson Williams and UF transfer Javares McRoy. The O-line did lose some solid players and will see how new coach Sam Pitman can bring them together.

The biggest question is on defense, where the Red Raiders have been among the nation's worst on D for the past two years. They don't lose much to graduation and Tommy Tuberville reshuffled his staff with some more experienced coaches. I expect things to be better on that side of the ball. 

Big picture, this team should get at least seven wins since they have one of the better QBs in the conference and more experience in their top 44.
 

From @rbode17 Which of Florida's big 3 will have the best 2012 season? 


I'll go with FSU. They finished 2011 with the most momentum, have the QB who is furthest along (E.J. Manuel) and have the best defense. They also have the most stability of the staffs among the Big Three.


From @Kentuckyclem how come the national media does not cover or do an exposé on over signing in the SEC? Seems to be the common denominator...


The national media has covered that topic. A lot. You can Google it and all the times we've talked about it in print. Not to mention all of the times many of us have been asked about it on the radio or on national TV shows.


From @DavidAnderson89 how come u didn't choose the CBS hat off the table when u made "the decision"?

That hat stuff is so 2008. Tweeting it made more sense. ... Better question, how come a man of your stature, didn't do something creative with your decision, like picking a Colorado State ski hat over a Boise State ski hat and a Stanford beret? 
Posted on: January 12, 2012 2:18 pm
 

San Diego State lands Katz

Ryan Katz, the strong-armed former Oregon State QB, is transferring to San Diego State. The 6-1, 215-pound quarterback confirmed the move to CBS Thursday morning. As a graduate student, he will be eligible to play in 2012 for the Aztecs. 


Katz becomes the second former Pac-12 player to join Rocky Long's program this week, following the news that former USC WR Brice Butler is also heading south.


Katz, known for having one of the most powerful arms in college football to go along with good mobility, started 14 games for the Beavers in three years, but was benched early in the 2011 season and sat behind redshirt freshman Sean Mannion. Katz figures to take over for departing SDSU QB Ryan Lindley.


The Santa Monica, Calif. native says the move is a great opportunity to come in and play right away, adding that it's "close to home. Coach (Rocky) Long and Coach (Andy) Ludwig are great coaches. I want to help them win ball games next year."


Word is the Aztecs also may end up with another former Pac-12 player in ex USC RB Dillon Baxter, a San Diego native. If Baxter ends up at SDSU, though, he wouldn't be eligible until the 2013 season.
Category: NCAAF
Posted on: January 5, 2012 11:49 am
Edited on: January 5, 2012 11:55 am
 

The man behind the hottest play in football

Late Wednesday night, Colorado School of Mines, a Division II school just down the road from the Coors facility in Golden, Co, was Trending nationally. The reason: Dana Holgorsen gave the school a sweet plug on national TV just a few minutes after West Virginia finished brutalizing Clemson 70-33 in the Orange Bowl. Well, actually, it's really because Holgorsen gave his pal, 46-year-old Bob Stitt, the Mines head football coach, a really, really sweet plug.

  Holgorsen was asked about the unique play that had devastated Clemson all night long, where WVU QB Geno Smith fields a shotgun snap and just flips it forward to a wideout motioning across the formation on a dead sprint. It's a variation of the Fly-Sweep that has caused defenses headaches for the past decade in major college football. Only in Holgorsen's play, the QB handles the ball for less than a heartbeat. Holgorsen explained to the country after the Orange Bowl that he learned that play from his buddy Bob Stitt from the Colorado School of Mines.

Back in Colorado, Stitt and his family were floored. "My 7 year-old just looked at me and his eyes were as big as saucers," Stitt told me Thursday morning. "My phone just starts blowing up with texts. I got about 30 in about 15 seconds."
 
  Holgorsen calls the play his "Quick" game. Stitt calls it "Fly". WVU scored on it four times Wednesday night. "Every time they ran it,  I told my wife, 'Yeah, that's the play that I showed Dana,'" Stitt said.
Of course, Stitt never expected to hear his name called out on national television. 

I've heard Stitt "clinic" with other top offensive minds over the past few years at the One-Back Clinic, a small gathering of some cutting-edge coaches each off-season. Whenever the soft-spoken Stitt walks to the front of those rooms, in front of some 20 coaches, most from the most prolific FBS programs, the guy commands their attention.

"These guys from some of the small schools are great, because they'll tell you everything they do because they want you to hire them someday," new UCLA offensive coordinator Noel Mazzone told me at last year's One-Back Clinic held at Houston a few minutes after Stitt talked about the pistol offense and back-shoulder throws. 
 

To guys like Holgorsen and Mazzone and Texas A&M's Kevin Sumlin, Stitt is the real deal, a ball coach with some proven great stuff. For the newer guys in that room, Stitt was the guy from the one school they'd probably never heard of that plays in Division II's Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference. But Stitt knew how to get their attention:

"If this stuff works with our guys, it'll probably work with the guys you have," Stitt would tell them. "We're an engineering school, and we only have one major, engineering. Our average ACT score in math is 29." That line would elicit the biggest "Oooh!" of the day. Well, that and Stitt talking about how his team averaged more than 356 passing yards in 2010.


The Orediggers were 8-3 this season, finishing No. 8 in the nation in passing. They had a 1000-yard rusher and a 3000-yard passer. Three of Mines' last four quarterbacks have been finalists for the Harlon Hill Trophy, the Division 2 Heisman.

Because his teams rarely have much speed, opponents often rush seven guys and play Zero-Coverage on them since they don't think Mines receivers can run by them. To counter that, Stitt resorted to the backshoulder passing attack. But, if he had to play against people afraid he's got the receivers who can run by em? Well, Holgorsen has 'em, as Clemson found out.
 
Stitt came up with his wrinkle on the Fly Sweep because he believed that it was more efficient than trying to have the quarterback hand the ball off after receiving the snap. Devoting all of the time to rep it to get the timing down seemed counter-productive to him. 
One day at practice, it came to him, 'Why not just put it (the ball) in the air?' He stopped practice and had his offense do that, and it immediately worked. And yes, that is one of the perks of being a small-college head coach. You can experiment with something like that in the middle of practice.

"The challenge of the Fly Sweep is meshing the handoff with the motion," he says. "With this, the speed of it's faster because you don't have to mesh the handoff, so that 4.3 guy (WR Tavon Austin) is going 4.3 as soon as he gets the ball. And the people that have to try and stop it are the inside 'backers, so you get that kid with that quickness, where he can stick his foot in the ground and get upfield, it's deadly."

  No kidding. Stitt first showed some of the FBS guys his play a few years ago at the One-Back Clinic when it was at UNLV. Hal Mumme, then at New Mexico State, loved it and installed it.  Mumme probably loves it even more because, technically, the play counts as a pass, not a run in the stat sheet. 
 
Holgorsen, though, didn't buy in until the spring of 2008. Stitt showed up at a UH practice after he'd flown down to Texas for fund-raiser. The Mines head coach was still in his golf gear and was checking out the Cougars practice from off in the distance. Holgorsen spotted him, 'See that fly sweep?'

  "Why aren't you putting that thing in the air?" Stitt replied.

Holgorsen said he'd forgotten all about that idea, but brought Stitt over, in full golf gear, to confer with him and quarterback Case Keenum. As Stitt gave them some pointers on how to run it, he couldn't help but think he was someplace he probably shouldn't be. But, a few minutes later, during the Cougars "Team" portion of practice, Holgorsen broke out the play on the unsuspecting Cougars defense. Head coach Kevin Sumlin was downright giddy. "Whoa, what was that?!?"

Houston got so good at it that Stitt smiled when he saw a few days ago in UH's romp over Penn State Keenum get a late snap and just 'volleyballed' it forward to the receiver without even controlling the ball.
 
As far as the specs of the play, Holgorsen and Stitt have different ways they dress it up. Stitt loves to run it out of a 3-by-1 (three receivers on one side of the formation) and run the play into the boundary side of the field. Holgorsen kept motioning one of his receivers into the backfield to set up in his diamond formation. The added benefit, Stitt points out, is what you can also do off the play. Holgorsen has taken that fly motion and run inside zone off it. "It is a great complement to the inside zone," Stitt says.

Stitt will run the fly motion and have his quarterback read the slot defender. If the guy doesn't cover that, they'll throw the bubble.
 
Just a hunch but you'll probably be seeing a lot more of this play in 2012. 
Posted on: January 3, 2012 3:08 pm
Edited on: January 3, 2012 3:23 pm
 

Talking RichRod, Carr, old & new media

John U. Bacon has spent years writing about University of Michigan athletics. A few months ago, Bacon released his book "Three and Out," which he wrote after spending three seasons around the Wolverines football program under Rich Rodriguez. Recently, I caught up with Bacon to talk about Michigan football, the dynamic between Lloyd Carr and Rodriguez and the climate around the program between "old" and "new" media. 

Feldman: What do you think is the biggest misconception most folks had about Rodriguez in his time at Michigan?

 

Bacon: That he was a bad guy who didn’t care about tradition, the rules or his players. From everything I saw, that was far from the case – and I believe his players would agree. Rodriguez took too long to learn Michigan’s gospel, and preached it too rarely from the pulpit, but privately he hammered home the value of Michigan tradition with his team every chance he had.  The contrast was striking – and puzzling. Why not say all that when the cameras are rolling? Before his noon work out, he called down every day to make sure no players remained in the room, lest his presence be interpreted as “coaching.”  And as for caring about his players, just ask Brock Mealer, Elliott’s brother, whom Rodriguez invited to work out with the strength staff to learn to walk again after his car accident, then asked to be the first man to touch the banner when they rededicated the stadium in 2010. Part of this problem was Rodriguez’s, however, who displayed little knack for public relations. <br /> 

Feldman: If Michigan had given Rodriguez one more season, how do you think the 2011 year would've gone on the field for the Wolverines?

Bacon: I can imagine two scenarios.  The first goes like this: Rodriguez lets his defensive staff go, and A.D. Dave Brandon gives him the same checkbook he gave Brady Hoke to get the best coaches out there. (Hoke’s defensive coordinator, Greg Mattison, will make $900,000 this season, more than three times the salaries of Rodriguez’s two DC’s.) With an easier schedule, Ohio State in trouble, Denard Robinson entering his second season leading Rodriguez’s spread offense, and 19 of 22 starters returning, it’s not hard to think they would go 10-2 or even better this year, and be poised to build on that for Robinson’s senior season.  

The other scenario goes like this: After the team finally caved in at the Gator Bowl, everyone had had enough of the endless pressure and debate over their coach’s tenure, and the team tanks after losing to Notre Dame. For the first scenario to occur, Dave Brandon would have to commit publicly to Rodriguez for another 2-3 years, and he obviously was not prepared to do that.  Perhaps few AD’s would have been. But, obviously, we’ll never know.     

 

Feldman: Former Michigan coach Lloyd Carr does not come across well in your book. I feel like in many cases coaches often have a tense relationship with the guy who they just followed or the guy who is just following them. What was the most surprising thing that Carr did?

Bacon: Transitions are hard for every organization, and harder still for established college football programs, where tradition is sacrosanct and coaches become icons. Handling this well is the rare exception, not the rule. The coach who follows you is going to do things differently, like it or not, and if he succeeds, your critics will say he’s better than you were, and if he fails, they will say you set him up for failure. It is truly a no-win situation. On the rare occasions when it does work well, the former coach helps the new guy every way he can – including staying out of the way at important times – and the new coach pays homage to his predecessor every chance he gets. Bump Elliott and Bo Schembechler handled it almost perfectly, as did Darrell Royal and Mack Brown. (Although Texas hired three coaches between the two, Royal is still the icon in Austin.)  Coach Carr and Rodriguez, to understate the case considerably, did not. 

The most surprising thing Carr did – and it took me a while to appreciate the significance of this – was call Rodriguez on December 10, 2007, to sell him on the job, pitch Rodriguez to then-AD Bill Martin the next day, and then, right after Rodriguez was named Michigan’s next head coach on December 17, 2007, call an unexpected meeting to let his players know if they wanted to transfer, he would sign the release form – a stunning, pre-emptive vote of no-confidence. The reporting on all these events comes directly from eyewitnesses – but I still can’t explain it.  Their relationship started off badly, and only got worse.

Feldman: Have you heard from Carr or people close to him since the book came out trying to explain some of the things your wrote about that he did?

Bacon: No.  And the silence, even for the taciturn Carr, has been striking. When Coach Carr had been accused by former Michigan All-American quarterback Rick Leach, among others, of not supporting Rich Rodriguez, Carr readily found a friendly reporter that same week to send a message, on the record, in support of Rich Rodriguez.  He has not responded to anything in<span style="text-decoration: underline;">Three and Out</span>, nor have Dave Brandon or the Detroit Free Press reporters, who have not normally been noted for their passivity.    

 

Feldman: You detailed a very interesting scene in the wake of Countable Hours controversy there between members of the local media there between "old media" and "new media." I know it's often odd when media becomes part of the story. Was that dynamic brewing there for a while and how do you think that has affected coverage of a college program?

Bacon: Good catch, Bruce. First, as you point out, few journalists like to report on other journalists. But when we considered downplaying or even omitting the Detroit Free Press front page story, which claimed Rodriguez had wildly and willfully exceeded the limits on practice time, it was clear that was impossible, as it had become a central part of the Rodriguez saga – and by design, it should be noted. 

This set up the conflict you describe, which occurred the day after the story came out, when Rodriguez addressed it at a press conference.  Brian Cook, who founded MGoBlog, a powerful website, approached Mark Snyder and Michael Rosenberg of the Free Press to ask if they knew the difference between “countable’ and “uncountable” hours – the very distinction on which the rule pivots, but one never mentioned in their piece.  The argument itself didn’t amount to much, except how it underscored the growing chasm between traditional print reporting and untraditional journalists.  As someone who works on both sides, I can say both have their strengths, but during the three years I was inside the program, you could see the balance of power shift to the new guys.  They usually lack the level of access and sources traditional reporters have, but, perhaps as a result, they worry less about whom they might offend. 

As an aside, it’s worth noting that the book has been hashed out in great detail by the writers and readers of the websites devoted to sports in general and Michigan football in particular, yet in both Detroit papers only one story even addressed it, and still left out the information above. Perhaps that proves your point.  For good or ill – and perhaps plenty of both -- we are already well into a new era. 

 

Of course, what we need are reporters with both access <em>and</em> the courage to report what they’ve found – but those seem to be in short supply these days.  I was not surprised to see the person who broke the Penn State story was not a beat reporter for a TV or radio station or the sports sections in Pittsburgh, Philadelphia or State College, but a 24-year-old crime reporter from the Patriot-News in Harrisburg named Sara Ganim.  Kudos to Ms. Ganim – and shame on the rest of us.  We need to do better.   

Category: NCAAF
Tags: Arizona, Michigan
 
Posted on: January 3, 2012 3:06 pm
Edited on: January 3, 2012 3:12 pm
 

Talking RichRod, Carr, old & new media

John U. Bacon has spent years writing about University of Michigan athletics. A few months ago, Bacon released his book "Three and Out," which he wrote after spending three seasons around the Wolverines football program under Rich Rodriguez. Recently, I caught up with Bacon to talk about Michigan football, the dynamic between Lloyd Carr and Rodriguez and the climate around the program between "old" and "new" media. 



Feldman: What do you think is the biggest misconception most folks had about Rodriguez in his time at Michigan?

  Bacon: That he was a bad guy who didn’t care about tradition, the rules or his players. From everything I saw, that was far from the case – and I believe his players would agree. Rodriguez took too long to learn Michigan’s gospel, and preached it too rarely from the pulpit, but privately he hammered home the value of Michigan tradition with his team every chance he had.  The contrast was striking – and puzzling. Why not say all that when the cameras are rolling? Before his noon work out, he called down every day to make sure no players remained in the room, lest his presence be interpreted as “coaching.”  And as for caring about his players, just ask Brock Mealer, Elliott’s brother, whom Rodriguez invited to work out with the strength staff to learn to walk again after his car accident, then asked to be the first man to touch the banner when they rededicated the stadium in 2010. Part of this problem was Rodriguez’s, however, who displayed little knack for public relations. 

  Feldman: If Michigan had given Rodriguez one more season, how do you think the 2011 year would've gone on the field for the Wolverines?
 
Bacon: I can imagine two scenarios.  The first goes like this: Rodriguez lets his defensive staff go, and A.D. Dave Brandon gives him the same checkbook he gave Brady Hoke to get the best coaches out there. (Hoke’s defensive coordinator, Greg Mattison, will make $900,000 this season, more than three times the salaries of Rodriguez’s two DC’s.) With an easier schedule, Ohio State in trouble, Denard Robinson entering his second season leading Rodriguez’s spread offense, and 19 of 22 starters returning, it’s not hard to think they would go 10-2 or even better this year, and be poised to build on that for Robinson’s senior season.  

The other scenario goes like this: After the team finally caved in at the Gator Bowl, everyone had had enough of the endless pressure and debate over their coach’s tenure, and the team tanks after losing to Notre Dame. For the first scenario to occur, Dave Brandon would have to commit publicly to Rodriguez for another 2-3 years, and he obviously was not prepared to do that.  Perhaps few AD’s would have been. But, obviously, we’ll never know.       

Feldman: Former Michigan coach Lloyd Carr does not come across well in your book. I feel like in many cases coaches often have a tense relationship with the guy who they just followed or the guy who is just following them. What was the most surprising thing that Carr did?
 
Bacon: Transitions are hard for every organization, and harder still for established college football programs, where tradition is sacrosanct and coaches become icons. Handling this well is the rare exception, not the rule. The coach who follows you is going to do things differently, like it or not, and if he succeeds, your critics will say he’s better than you were, and if he fails, they will say you set him up for failure. It is truly a no-win situation. On the rare occasions when it does work well, the former coach helps the new guy every way he can – including staying out of the way at important times – and the new coach pays homage to his predecessor every chance he gets. Bump Elliott and Bo Schembechler handled it almost perfectly, as did Darrell Royal and Mack Brown. (Although Texas hired three coaches between the two, Royal is still the icon in Austin.)  Coach Carr and Rodriguez, to understate the case considerably, did not. 
 
The most surprising thing Carr did – and it took me a while to appreciate the significance of this – was call Rodriguez on December 10, 2007, to sell him on the job, pitch Rodriguez to then-AD Bill Martin the next day, and then, right after Rodriguez was named Michigan’s next head coach on December 17, 2007, call an unexpected meeting to let his players know if they wanted to transfer, he would sign the release form – a stunning, pre-emptive vote of no-confidence. The reporting on all these events comes directly from eyewitnesses – but I still can’t explain it.  Their relationship started off badly, and only got worse.
 
Feldman: Have you heard from Carr or people close to him since the book came out trying to explain some of the things your wrote about that he did?
 
Bacon: No.  And the silence, even for the taciturn Carr, has been striking. When Coach Carr had been accused by former Michigan All-American quarterback Rick Leach, among others, of not supporting Rich Rodriguez, Carr readily found a friendly reporter that same week to send a message, on the record, in support of Rich Rodriguez.  He has not responded to anything inThree and Out, nor have Dave Brandon or the Detroit Free Press reporters, who have not normally been noted for their passivity.    
    Feldman: You detailed a very interesting scene in the wake of Countable Hours controversy there between members of the local media there between "old media" and "new media." I know it's often odd when media becomes part of the story. Was that dynamic brewing there for a while and how do you think that has affected coverage of a college program?
 
Bacon: Good catch, Bruce. First, as you point out, few journalists like to report on other journalists. But when we considered downplaying or even omitting the Detroit Free Press front page story, which claimed Rodriguez had wildly and willfully exceeded the limits on practice time, it was clear that was impossible, as it had become a central part of the Rodriguez saga – and by design, it should be noted. 
 
This set up the conflict you describe, which occurred the day after the story came out, when Rodriguez addressed it at a press conference.  Brian Cook, who founded MGoBlog, a powerful website, approached Mark Snyder and Michael Rosenberg of the Free Press to ask if they knew the difference between “countable’ and “uncountable” hours – the very distinction on which the rule pivots, but one never mentioned in their piece.  The argument itself didn’t amount to much, except how it underscored the growing chasm between traditional print reporting and untraditional journalists.  As someone who works on both sides, I can say both have their strengths, but during the three years I was inside the program, you could see the balance of power shift to the new guys.  They usually lack the level of access and sources traditional reporters have, but, perhaps as a result, they worry less about whom they might offend.   

As an aside, it’s worth noting that the book has been hashed out in great detail by the writers and readers of the websites devoted to sports in general and Michigan football in particular, yet in both Detroit papers only one story even addressed it, and still left out the information above. Perhaps that proves your point.  For good or ill – and perhaps plenty of both -- we are already well into a new era. 
 
  Of course, what we need are reporters with both access and the courage to report what they’ve found – but those seem to be in short supply these days.  I was not surprised to see the person who broke the Penn State story was not a beat reporter for a TV or radio station or the sports sections in Pittsburgh, Philadelphia or State College, but a 24-year-old crime reporter from the Patriot-News in Harrisburg named Sara Ganim.  Kudos to Ms. Ganim – and shame on the rest of us.  We need to do better.   
Category: NCAAF
Tags: Arizona, Michigan
 
Posted on: December 30, 2011 5:27 pm
Edited on: December 30, 2011 9:13 pm
 

Friday Mailbag: Getting a read on Kelly's ND

Time for the last Friday mailbag of 2011. As always, send questions to me via Twitter at BFeldmanCBS.

From @FormerlyAGuest  Why are people down on Brian Kelly? Don't they remember ND getting boatraced by every good team in the Davie/Ty/Weis years?

  It's the expectations that come with the place and also with the fact that he was a "proven" head coach, not a guy growing into the job. On top of that, there was a lot of hype that this team was ready to get to 10 wins (more than even the normal ND overhype that tends to come for the Irish) and get into a BCS bowl especially since Kelly cleared star WR Michael Floyd for the season. But aside from a big win over a good Michigan State team in mid-September, it was a frustration year for the Irish with them going 3-4 against teams with winning records. Quite frankly, it's hard to look at this team and say they are close to being a powerhouse. They're a far leap from where LSU and a few others are at this point. They have some gifted players. Just nowhere near the number they need to be a real elite team.

I still am convinced Kelly is a significant upgrade over Charlie Weis and feel like he will get the Irish back to being a legit Top 20 team consistently, but I would've thought they'd been further along at this stage. I figured, at worst, they'd win nine this season. Instead, they went 8-5, getting pushed around at home vs. arch-rival USC; weren't really close to Stanford and finished with a loss to an FSU team with a patch-work O-line loaded with freshmen.

I suspect some of the digs at Kelly stem from his sideline demeanor, framed by the cameras showing him berating players and getting so red-faced. Truth be told, he's far from the only coach who has ripped a player on the sideline. It's just now the spotlight on him is brighter and more cameras are on him. It also doesn't help his cause that his team had a maddening penchant for turnovers and Red Zone problems.

The upshot coming out of the 2011 season is that you don't the sense the Irish staff feel great about the quarterback situation going into Year Three. Tommy Rees didn't seem to make much progress. The jury's still out on Andrew Hendrix, and now they lose their best weapon in WR Michael Floyd and maybe TE Tyler Eifert. You'd think they should be better with the QBs with another year more seasoning (including strong-armed redshirt Everett Golson into that mix as well), but we'll see. They missed out on five-star QB recruit Gunnar Kiel, who had ND ties so it seems that Kelly's future for ND in the next three years is tied to Rees/Hendrix/Golson. We know this: Floyd won't be easily replaced. There are reportedly some talented recruits coming to South Bend, but we'll hold off getting too fired up on that front too since we hear that every year with them.

The bright side: I do like what I see from the defense, especially in DE Aaron Lynch and the young linemen, but on the other side of the ball, it's shaky. Worse still, it seems like their two arch-rivals, USC and Michigan, are surging upward and primed for big years in 2012.


From @abellwillring  EJ (Manuel) didn't perform at the level we hoped this yr but looked very good in the clutch last night. Do you think he'll build off it?

  I do expect him and the Noles to build off that come-from-behind win over Notre Dame Thursday. I was impressed by the way Manuel kept battling after taking a pounding in the first half. The young FSU O-line looked really shaky but settled down in the second half. The other thing to really like about the outlook for the Noles offense is that two of Manuel's best targets are freshmen, WR Rashad Greene and TE Nick O'Leary.


Still, I suspect expectations will be kept in check somewhat because in recent years there's been so much hype about the Noles being back, and time and again, they've underwhelmed for one reason or another. Pollsters will be gunshy to buy them, I think. They'd have to be, no? No!?? I mean they seemed good on paper going into this year and still lost games to Wake Forest and UVa, among others.

From @NakedShort11 Can Weis turn KU around?


It's never smart to speak in absolutes when it comes to these things, but I don't like his chances to turn Kansas into a top 20 football program consistently. Or even close to that. He takes over a very bad team that was so far away from being competitive, that just getting them to a mediocre bowl game is going to be an uphill battle. 

Weis' rep for developing QBs will help, and it's obviously helped him land former ND quarterback Dayne Crist and ex-BYU quarterback Jake Heaps (both were top recruits but had struggled before losing their starting jobs.) I expect them to get better on offense, but it's the defense where they've been spectacularly inept, and Weis never was able to get a defense going in South Bend. And I just don't see him having the recruiting cache to get enough playmakers on that side of the ball to contend with OU, OK State, Texas and now TCU and WVU. His staff recruited well at Notre Dame, but that was ND, not Kansas, and his profile doesn't carry as much juice as it did when he arrived in South Bend. Kansas football doesn't have the appeal that Notre Dame does and Weis was more of a big deal 5-6 years ago then he is after fizzling out at ND and having a mediocre season in Florida. I suspect his pitch will play well to QBs and tight ends, but won't get blue-chippers at other spots that fired up, compared to some of those other Big 12 schools.

Mark Mangino did a really good job at KU. He left there with a 50-48 record and won three bowl games, including a BCS bowl. I'll be very surprised if Weis leaves there with as good a winning percentage.


From @melesse Wondering where you stand on Dooley's decision to not give freshman WR Arnett his full release? 

First, some background on what has become a messy story involving a former four-star prospect in last year's recruiting class at Tennessee: A UT spokesman says Arnett, a Michigan native who wants to transfer closer to home, is not being denied the opportunity to play at the FBS level. The school also has a policy of not releasing players to schools the Vols play against or "recruit against". O.K., that last part is interesting because you could say that would stop them from any school in the country if the want to stretch it that way. After all, guys like Arnett are "national" recruits and therefore the Vols had to beat virtually everyone to land him. Anyhow, Arnett says he wants to transfer closer to home to be near his ailing father, but some of the schools he's intrigued by--Michigan and Michigan State--Dooley won't release him to. Just MAC schools.
 

[If Arnett enrolls at a school Dooley won't release him to, he has to foot the bill for a year, which the kid says he and his family cannot afford.]

This is just the latest Dooley goof after a dud of a 2011 season. It's a PR nightmare. To say this isn't going to play well for Dooley is an understatement.  By all accounts, Dooley is playing hardball with Arnett. The kid is clearly unhappy about something there. The guy who recruited Arnett to Knoxville, Charlie Baggett, the Vols receivers coach, retired after the 5-7 season.


If a guy doesn't really want to be somewhere or part of something, do you want that person around? I'd say no, especially if he's gone to the levels of this that Arnett and his family have. Then again, Dooley's got to be feeling the pressure after a dismal 2011. Fact is, stuff like this isn't going to make landing blue-chippers any easier for him. The kid is a talented receiver and would be a significant blow if he opts to leave. The Vols WR depth chart is already pretty thin. Dooley needs to show marked improvement in 2012.

Word is Arnett will make his decision by Monday. You have to wonder if the perception of Arnett going to a mid-major program closer to his home will compel the Michigan native to stick it out in Knoxville. I imagine that is what Dooley is hoping. I don't see Dooley relenting and releasing him to the big Michigan schools. Dooley's taking the PR hit already. I'm sure rival recruiters will remind prospects of this story a lot as long as Dooley is coaching at UT. Then again, with the moves Dooley has made, you chave to wonder if that'll be more than another year or two.


From @erik_gillespie  Does Keith Price have any sort of NFL future? Or will the "not tall enough, arm strength not good enough" catch up to him?

He just finished his sophomore year and ended on an impressive note. Price has a good arm and very good feet. His size isn't good at about 6-feet, 195 pounds, but he'll get stronger and he is a guy who throws well on the move. He's as tall as Drew Brees, Mike Vick, Chase Daniel and a bunch of other QBs. Price also plays in a very good pro-style system right now. Sarkisian's staff knows how to develop a QB in terms of an NFL game. I'll be very surprised if in 2014, Keith Price isn't on an NFL roster as a back-up QB.


From @steakNstiffarms  Ducks struggle when opp has >1wk to prepare, Wisc struggles w/ great teams away from Camp Randall. Which holds true on Monday?

Well said. For both of these staffs, as much as they don't want to acknowledge outside skepticism, you want to quash it as soon as you can because all of the questions that keep coming (about both issues you point out) can become distractions and push their way into people's minds. My hunch is Oregon will win. Part of that is because the Badgers are dealing with some coaching staff transition with Chryst getting the Pitt job, and things like that, always make life a little harder even if Wisconsin had to deal with it last year when Dave Doeren took the NIU job. 


From @felimalipe RG III is a better college FB player than Cam Newton was?

I think both are fantastic QBs and franchise guys. Robert Griffin III changed the way people think about Baylor. He is awe-inspiring, on and off the field. He deserved the Heisman. Keep in mind, Baylor has one of the six worst defenses in college football this season. Four of those inept defenses were on teams that didn't win more than two games this season. The other team, Texas Tech, went 5-7. Baylor won 10 games. Baylor. 10 games.

That said, for one season, Cam Newton is the best college QB I've ever covered. What he did for Auburn and how he did it, when all of that scrutiny mounted, unlike anything any other top college football player has faced in the spotlight, was truly remarkable.
 
 
 
 
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