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Tag:Kentucky
Posted on: February 7, 2012 1:02 pm
 

Tuesday Top 10: Best assistant moves

As we try and size up the best and worst head coaching hires of the the past few months, I thought it was worth delving into some of the top in-the-trenches guys and staffers who made news but on a much smaller scale during "the silly season" that is the coaching carousel. This week's Top 10: best assistant moves:

1. Oklahoma hiring back Mike Stoops as defensive coordinator: Some Sooner fans have been lamenting the Mike Stoops Jinx for years now noting that OU football hasn't been as tough or as effective, especially in big games since Bob Stoops' fiery brother left for Arizona. On paper, the younger Stoops brother certainly left a mark, coaching OU to the top or near the top in almost every significant defensive statistic. He also sparked OU to a school-best 48 wins over a four-year stretch from 2000-03 that included a BCS national title. During that four-year stretch OU had three top-five finishes and produced 10 All-Americans on defense. In the eight years since he's been out of Norman, the Sooners have only had two top-five finishes and six All-Americans on D. 

2. Washington hires Tosh Lupoi as D-line coach: The Huskies had been atrocious on defense prompting Steve Sarkisian to make some tough changes. One of them meant breaking the bank for the 30-year old former Cal assistant, who helped mentor some really good defensive linemen for the Golden Bears with Cameron Jordan and Tyson Alualu both becoming first-rounders in recent years. However, Lupoi's biggest impact comes off the field, where his departure shook up the recruiting world in the past few months. Five-star DB Shaq Thompson took a late visit up to U-Dub and ended up signing with the Huskies. Lupoi also got long-time USC DE commit Pio Vatuvei to flip to Washington on Signing Day. If Lupoi doesn't bolt for Seattle, Cal probably reels in a Top 10 recruiting class despite the fact that it has a sub .500 record in league play the past three years. But the coach's exit torpedoed that, and yes, it was messy. Expect many more fireworks in the coming year and for U-Dub to be a player nationally on the recruiting scene as long as Lupoi is with the Huskies.

3. Michigan State retains DC Pat Narduzzi: Arguably the most underrated defensive coordinator in college football, Narduzzi was courted by Kevin Sumlin after the new Texas A&M coach arrived at the SEC program, but MSU was able to hang onto the Youngstown product. That's quite a coup for the Spartans. In 2010, Narduzzi led MSU to one of its better defensive seasons in years. But going into last season he had to replace four of the top five tacklers, including star LB Greg Jones. The result: the Spartans played even better. MSU was No. 6 in the country in total defense; No. 10 in scoring; No. 7 in sacks and No. 9 against the run. They won 11 games and finished in the Top 10 for the first time since the Nick Saban days in the late '90s.

4. UNC lands Vic Koenning as its defensive coordinator: One of the best moves Ron Zook made at Illinois was flipping the keys to Koenning to run his defense. Koenning transformed the Illini D from 91st nationally to No. 7 in one year. He also sparked a dramatic improvement in K-State's defense at his previous stop. In his last stint in the ACC, at Clemson, Koenning (pronounced "CONE-ing") did something no other Tiger DC ever could do:  Each of his four defenses from 2005-2008 finished in the top 25 in scoring, total, and pass efficiency defense each season.

5. Urban Meyer reunites with Mickey Marotti as Ohio State gets a new strength coach: A huge key for Meyer in his run at UF was surrounding himself with a great staff. With the possible exception of Charlie Strong, no other assistant was more vital to UF's success in that time than Marotti, who goes back with Meyer to their days in Columbus in the late 80s when both were just beginning their coaching careers. When Meyer talked about his new staff at OSU, Marotti was the one he called his "most important hire." The one-time OSU grad assistant developed 22 All-Americans and eight first-rounders during his seven years in Gainesville.



6. Jim Mora recruits his ace recruiters: The new UCLA head coach had never really worked in college and there was a lot of skepticism about how the NFL lifer would acclimate to things like recruiting. Well, Mora wasted little time getting up to speed by landing a couple of assistants with deep California connections in O-line coach Adrian Klemm and Demetrice Martin, a pair of aggressive young assistants who grew up in the L.A. area. Martin helped snag Ellis McCarthy, perhaps the top defensive lineman on the West Coast, along with touted DE Jeremy Castro, while Klemm nabbed a bunch of other blue-chippers that included CB Ishmael Adams, WR Jordan Payton and OT Lacy Westbrook.

7. Paul Chryst brings O-line coach Bob Bostad to Pitt: The Panthers were beyond brutal up front. They ranked dead last in the NCAA in sacks allowed with an eye-popping 64-- 17 more than the next worst team. You almost never see such wide gaps in the pits of the NCAA ineptitude stats. That figures to get a whole lot better under Chryst and Bostad. The former Badger O-line coach developed four all-Americans in the past two seasons alone (Gabe Carimi, John Moffitt, Kevin Zeitler and Peter Konz) as Wisconsin rushed for over 3,000 yards the past two seasons en route to consecutive Rose Bowl appearances. Bostad's O-line actually allowed two few sacks in the past three seasons combined in 40 games than Pitt surrendered in 2011.

8. Rich Rodriguez finally gets Jeff Casteel back to run his defense: Rodriguez' biggest shortcoming from his time at Michigan was not being able to have his former WVU DC with him to run the Wolverines defense. Casteel has coached defenses that have finished in the top 15 in scoring D in four of the previous seven seasons. In 2010, the Mountaineers were third in the nation in scoring defense. Better still, Casteel is bringing a couple of WVU defensive assistants with him to Tucson who knew exactly what he wants and does. They will have plenty of work ahead of them in the most diverse offensive league as they inherit a team that was 107th in scoring defense and 116th in sacks.

9. Florida goes to Boise for its new OC: Charlie Weis had a very shaky season in Gainesville as the Gators stumbled in their transition season out of the Urban Meyer offense, finishing 105th in the country in total offense. Pease moves south after working with one of the most productive QBs in college history (Kellen Moore). The 47-year-old Pease also had a lot of success in his days at Montana in the 90s and had some good moments leading an undermanned Kentucky offense in the SEC before moving to Boise.

10. Mike Locksley is back at Maryland: No doubt Locksley had a disastrous run as New Mexico's head coach, going 2-26 and being at the center of a few off-field scandals. He signs on with second-year coach Randy Edsall, who had a disastrous beginning with the Terps going 2-10 with only one win over an FBS opponent. But never underestimate the recruiting juice Locksley has, especially in that part of the country.  He will get kids who would never get within sniffing distance of Edsall's program to give the Terps a long, hard look now. And the school made sure to sweeter Locksley's deal on that front. According to the Washington Post, if Maryland is ranked in the top 40 by either Rivals.com or Scout.com's recruiting rankings on National Signing Day, Locksley will earn $25,000. He'll also get an additional $20,000 if the Terrapins place in the top four of ACC teams in the Rivals.com or Scout.com's rankings on National Signing Day.
Posted on: October 27, 2011 2:17 pm
Edited on: October 27, 2011 2:24 pm
 

Hal Mumme's latest QB as talented as Couch?

Once again, Hal Mumme is leading the country in passing. No big surprise there that he's got a team piling up points, but it's the blossoming of his fell-through-the-cracks quarterback that is starting to get some attention for a tiny school in Texas.

Mumme, the former Kentucky coach, is now at tiny McMurry University in Abilene, Texas, a Division III program about to make the jump up to D2. The War Hawks (5-2) are in one those of those transitional years where they faced a few programs from bigger classifications, teams that can give scholarships. In their opener, the War Hawks were pounded 82-6 by FCS power Stephen F. Austin, but since then Mumme's team has been rolling. They came back the following week to beat another scholarship program from what used to be known as 1-AA, UTSA, 24-21. 

McMurry, running the prolific Air-Raid system, is averaging 380 yards per game. They've won their past four games by an average of 54-16.

Mumme's attack is led by an intriguing prospect named Jake Mullin, a 6-3, 225-pound junior quarterback already generating a little buzz from pro scouts. It's not often Division III players get that kind of attention, but Mullin's unique.

He was passed over by major college recruiters because he played in a run-heavy Wing-T system at Burleson High. The scouts who did notice him may have been scared off because Mullin's a standout baseball player and there was speculation he might get drafted and go that route. It also didn't help that he has a speech impediment and scouts are skeptical about QBs who struggle to bark out play calls in the huddle or communicate with teammates. He ended up on the baseball team at McMurry, a school of about 1300 students.

Mumme was hired in 2009 to take over a program that had gone 0-10 the previous year. He was grateful to find the big QB on the campus. Actually, when the coach arrived, he'd asked his players if there were any QBs on the team, thinking maybe there'd be a guy with some throwing ability that got switched to another position. Instead, Mumme was told by the players, the best QB at the school was playing intermural football and tearing it up. A few of Mullin's old high school teammates were football players at McMurry and informed Mumme that the QB could really throw it, but his coaches hadn't let him throw it. Mumme went to see Mullin play baseball and could see the kid's athleticism as the all-conference outfielder wowed the football coach.

Mullin had heard plenty from his buddies and was intrigued by the opportunity to play in Mumme's system. After some bad luck, Mullin, who has had to overcome a bout with the Swine Flu and a broken collarbone in his first two seasons of college football, has picked up the Air-Raid scheme quite well. 

"He's really, really good," Mumme told me Thursday morning of the QB with a 20-8 TD-INT ratio and a 66 percent completion mark this fall. "He's got one more year with us, but he's about as good as anybody I ever had."

When Mumme said that, it stunned me to hear the coach make such a statement about the DIII QB when he'd coached, among others, Tim Couch, a guy who was the first pick overall of the NFL draft.

"Jake is great with his feet," Mumme said. "He's probably 6-3, 225, runs about a 4.65 and has real live arm. He is a very accurate deep passer. He can throw the long out from the hash mark which we do a lot. He's a smart kid. He's just gotta learn to be more patient to dump it off because he's so good at spinning out of the pocket and making a play."

Yeah, but as good as Couch?

"I'd hesitate to say that," Mumme said. "With the competition level, it's hard to say that right now, but physically, he's definitely as good."

Word has gotten out. NFL scouts have already been to Abilene to take a look at Mullin, Mumme said. Last week, McMurry beat Texas Lutheran on the road 60-16 with Mullin going 43-57 for 614 yards and four TDs. 

Mullin and the War Hawks will face stiffer competition on 2012 when they move up to D2. They'll play McNeese State and Lamar and several other bigger programs.

Just how much of an issue Mullin's speech impediment may have in pro scouts' eyes remains to be seen. "His really isn't that bad," said Mumme. "When I first met him I actually didn't know he had one. It's more of a stammer than a stutter. He'll probably need some tutoring on that because in our system it's easy with the play calls because the plays are one or two words. In the NFL, it's like 18 words together."

For now, Mumme's just excited about how much better Mullin can get in his system. You can pretty much count on the QB to have a few more days with gaudy stat lines.
Category: NCAAF
Posted on: October 11, 2011 10:45 am
Edited on: October 11, 2011 6:08 pm
 

Tuesday Top 10: Biggest duds of first half

We've seen through the first half of the season that many things (Oklahoma, LSU, Andrew Luck, Trent Richardson) have been as good as advertised while a few others have emerged as pleasant surprises (Clemson, K-State, CSU's Nordly Capi, Illinois), which we hit on last week here in the blog. But there is a flipside to that. This week's Top 10 list: biggest disappointments of the first half of the season:

1. FSU: After an off-season of hype about how "the Noles are back!!", the team that was preseason No. 6 team, has been a complete dud. FSU has lost three in a row and really hasn't beat anyone of note. FSU is one of those schools that the media (and I'm guilty of this too because I was practically serving drinks on that bandwagon since January) is all too eager to get fired up about. Then again, anyone who spent time around Tallahassee this off-season heard the way Jimbo Fisher talked about this team and its talent and its focus and maturity and well, we couldn't help but get more intrigued. Yes, there have been injuries to a few key guys (QB E.J. Manuel and WR Bert Reed) but lots of teams deal with injuries. The Noles have been mistake-ridden and are doing the kinds of things elite teams simply don't have issues with. They are 114th in turnover margin, 112th in rushing, 100th in sacks allowed and 120th in penalties.

2. Maryland's offense: Maybe this stems from The Curse of Ralph, but whatever it is, things are off to a dismal start for Randy Edsall in College Park. Danny O'Brien came into the season as one of the most promising young QBs in college football (22-8 TD-INT ratio as a freshman in 2010) but now looks completely lost. O'Brien has a 4-6 TD-INT mark and was benched after going 1-6 last week against Ga. Tech. O'Brien was sharp in last year's West-Coast style offense. In Edsall's new spread under Gary Crowton, the QB has been a mess. The Terps who were 9-4 last season and 29th in scoring and scored over 40 points five times last season, are 91st in scoring.

3. Mississippi State: No one thought Dan Mullen's team was going to win the loaded SEC West this year, but the way the Bulldogs have fizzled has been a head-shaker. They needed overtime to beat La. Tech and trailed a miserable UAB squad 3-0 at halftime before coming back to win 21-3. And those are actually some of the more positive things. MSU is 0-3 in SEC play and will likely need to knock off one of the SEC's better teams (South Carolina, Bama or Arkansas) just to finish above .500.

4. Memphis: It's only Year Two for coach Larry Porter running this dumpster fire of a football program and it's hard to think any coach could fix things in that short of a time frame, but should things look as bad as they do now? The C-USA Tigers actually might be the worst team in FBS. They are 1-5 with their lone win coming against FCS Austin Peay. The Tigers then lost to a Sun Belt team that was 4-8 last year (Arkansas State) 47-3. Then they lost to a Rice team that came in 1-3 and the Owls crushed Memphis 28-6. The Tigers are 116th in scoring and 115th in defense. And this is a program that Memphis AD R.C. Johnson "deserves to be in the SEC"?!?! Of all of the out-of-touch comments made by administrators and power brokers in the NCAA in the past year, Johnson's line is king.

5. Ohio State: An offseason overstuffed with off-field drama has carried over to the fall, where the Buckeyes and first-year head coach Luke Fickell have dealt with more player suspensions, which has only created more problems for a team that was already depleted. There were signs early that this could be a long season for OSU when the Buckeyes almost got knocked off by a Toledo team that gave Fickell's team all it could handle despite committing a ton of penalties in Week 2. Then Miami and Lamar Miller lit them up while the OSU passing game was atrocious. It hasn't gotten much better since. OSU barely avoided getting shutout in Columbus by Michigan State. Then last week, the Buckeyes blew a 21-point lead in the second half at Nebraska and lost 34-27 thanks to more ineptitude in the passing game and the Huskers run game rolling over the OSU D. With a road trip to unbeaten Illinois, Wisconsin and games against Penn State and at Michigan remaining, it's no stretch to think Ohio State could miss a bowl game entirely. The good news? Word is Urban Meyer is going to be very tempted to take this coaching job.

6. Kentucky offense:
We know that the Wildcats lost some key offensive guys from last year's team when WR Randall Cobb, RB Derrick Locke and QB Mike Hartline moved on, but no SEC team should be this much of a mess on offense, especially when you consider most of the offensive line was back. UK managed only 14 points and just 190 yards of total offense in its opener against WKU, a 1-4 team that gave up 44 points to Indiana State.  
Last weekend against South Carolina, UK's level of ineptitude was staggering: matching its number of first downs (six) with turnovers (six). The Cats QB went 4-26 for 17 yards with four INTs, which was indicative of a team near the bottom of the NCAA ranks in rushing and passing and 119th in scoring. Kentucky beat writer Kyle Tucker broke down the futility even further. He noted that 174 of their 377 offensive plays (over 46 percent) have gained no yards, negative yards or ended up turning the ball over. It's been that bad.

7. Arizona:
 As I reported here in the blog Monday, despite leading the Cats to bowl games in three straight seasons (something which doesn't happen much with Wildcat football), a 1-5 start meant the end of Mike Stoops in Tucson. The Cats were dreadfully inexperienced on both lines and missing their best DB, safety Adam Hall for most of the season so far and standout WR Juron Criner also had been out didn't help. Nor did a front-loaded schedule, which featured back-to-back-to-back games against three top 10 teams. Last week's loss to previously winless Oregon State 37-27 proved to be the final straw. The Cats would be higher on this list, but realistically looking at the first half of their schedule and all of the inexperience on the lines and it was hard to figure they'd be more than 2-4 at this point.

8. Texas A&M defense:
This is the second year in Tim DeRuyter's system, but even without the great Von Miller, things have been a lot shakier for the Aggies than most would've expected. A&M suffered consecutive second-half collapses against Oklahoma State and Arkansas, where the Aggies gave up almost 1000 yards or passing. A&M was able to stop the losing streak at Texas Tech last weekend, but still got shredded for 40 points. They are dead last in pass defense and close to that in turnover margin (104th).

9. Boston College:
The Eagles (1-5) have one of the best players in college football in LB Luke Kuechly but the rest of the team is simply not producing. Their lone win was over FCS UMass. BC has lost three home games to Northwestern, Duke and Wake Forest. And the schedule hasn't really started to get into the toughest part for them yet.

10. Minnesota:
It has been a trying year for the Gophers. First-year head coach Jerry Kill has battled health issues, but after a respectable close loss at USC in the opener, it's been one dreadful performance after another for this team. The Gophers lost at home to New Mexico State, a team that has a hard time beating anyone that isn't New Mexico. Then, Minnesota lost to North Dakota State and been outscored by Michigan and Purdue 103-17 the past two weeks. A 1-11 season looks likely.
Posted on: October 11, 2011 10:44 am
 

Tuesday Top 10: Biggest duds of first half

We've seen through the first half of the season that many things (Oklahoma, LSU, Andrew Luck, Trent Richardson) have been as good as advertised while a few others have emerged as pleasant surprises (Clemson, K-State, CSU's Nordly Capi, Illinois), which we hit on last week here in the blog. But there is a flipside to that. This week's Top 10 list: biggest disappointments of the first half of the season:<br /> 

<br /><br />

<strong>1. FSU:</strong> After an off-season of hype about how "the Noles are back!!", the team that was preseason No. 6 team, has been a complete dud. FSU has lost three in a row and really hasn't beat anyone of note. FSU is one of those schools that the media (and I'm guilty of this too because I was practically serving drinks on that bandwagon since January) is all too eager to get fired up about. Then again, anyone who spent time around Tallahassee this off-season heard the way Jimbo Fisher talked about this team and its talent and its focus and maturity and well, we couldn't help but get more intrigued. Yes, there have been injuries to a few key guys (QB E.J. Manuel and WR Bert Reed) but lots of teams deal with injuries. The Noles have been mistake-ridden and are doing the kinds of things elite teams simply don't have issues with. They are 114th in turnover margin, 112th in rushing, 100th in sacks allowed and 120th in penalties.<br /> 

<span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span>

<strong><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">2. </span>Maryland's offense:</strong> Maybe this stems from The Curse of Ralph, but whatever it is, things are off to a dismal start for Randy Edsall in College Park. Danny O'Brien came into the season as one of the most promising young QBs in college football (22-8 TD-INT ratio as a freshman in 2010) but now looks completely lost. O'Brien has a 4-6 TD-INT mark and was benched after going 1-6 last week against Ga. Tech. O'Brien was sharp in last year's West-Coast style offense. In Edsall's new spread under Gary Crowton, the QB has been a mess. The Terps who were 9-4 last season and 29th in scoring and scored over 40 points five times last season, are 91st in scoring.

<br /><br /><br /><strong>3. Mississippi State:</strong> No one thought Dan Mullen's team was going to win the loaded SEC West this year, but the way the Bulldogs have fizzled has been a head-shaker. They needed overtime to beat La. Tech and trailed a miserable UAB squad 3-0 at halftime before coming back to win 21-3. And those are actually some of the more positive things. MSU is 0-3 in SEC play and will likely need to knock off one of the SEC's better teams (South Carolina, Bama or Arkansas) just to finish above .500.<br /> 

<br /><br /><strong>4. Memphis:</strong> It's only Year Two for coach Larry Porter running this dumpster fire of a football program and it's hard to think any coach could fix things in that short of a time frame, but should things look as bad as they do now? The C-USA Tigers actually might be the worst team in FBS. They are 1-5 with their lone win coming against FCS Austin Peay. The Tigers then lost to a Sun Belt team that was 4-8 last year (Arkansas State) 47-3. Then they lost to a Rice team that came in 1-3 and the Owls crushed Memphis 28-6. The Tigers are 116th in scoring and 115th in defense. And this is a program that Memphis AD R.C. Johnson "deserves to be in the SEC"?!?! Of all of the out-of-touch comments made my administrators and power brokers in the NCAA in the past year, Johnson's line is king.

<br /><br /><strong>5. Ohio State:</strong> An offseason overstuffed with off-field drama has carried over to the fall, where the Buckeyes and first-year head coach Luke Fickell have dealt with more player suspensions, which has only created more problems for a team that was already depleted. There were signs early that this could be a long season for OSU when the Buckeyes almost got knocked off by a Toledo team that gave Fickell's team all it could handle despite committing a ton of penalties in Week 2. Then Miami and Lamar Miller lit them up while the OSU passing game was atrocious. It hasn't gotten much better since. OSU barely avoided getting shutout in Columbus by Michigan State. Then last week, the Buckeyes blew a 21-point lead in the second half at Nebraska and lost 34-27 thanks to more ineptitude in the passing game and the Huskers run game rolling over the OSU D. With a road trip to unbeaten Illinois, Wisconsin and games against Penn State and at Michigan remaining, it's no stretch to think Ohio State could miss a bowl game entirely. The good news? Word is Urban Meyer is going to be very tempted to take this coaching job.

<span style="color: #333333; font-family: verdana, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Helvetica;"><br /><br /></span></span>

<strong>6. Kentucky offense:</strong> We know that the Wildcats lost some key offensive guys from last year's team when WR Randall Cobb, RB Derrick Locke and QB Mike Hartline moved on, but no SEC team should be this much of a mess on offense, especially when you consider most of the offensive line was back. UK managed only 14 points and just 190 yards of total offense in its opener against WKU, a 1-4 team that gave up 44 points to Indiana State.  <br />Last weekend against South Carolina, UK's level of ineptitude was staggering: matching its number of first downs (six) with turnovers (six). The Cats QB went 4-26 for 17 yards with four INTs, which was indicative of a team near the bottom of the NCAA ranks in rushing and passing and 119th in scoring. Kentucky beat writer Kyle Tucker broke down the futility</a> even further. He noted that 174 of their 377 offensive plays (over 46 percent) have gained no yards, negative yards or ended up turning the ball over. It's been <em>that</em> bad.

<br /><br /><strong>7. Arizona:</strong> As I reported here in the blog Monday, despite leading the Cats to bowl games in three straight seasons (something which doesn't happen much with Wildcat football), a 1-5 start meant the end of Mike Stoops in Tucson. The Cats were dreadfully inexperienced on both lines and missing their best DB, safety Adam Hall for most of the season so far and standout WR Juron Criner also had been out didn't help. Nor did a front-loaded schedule, which featured back-to-back-to-back games against three top 10 teams. Last week's loss to previously winless Oregon State 37-27 proved to be the final straw. The Cats would be higher on this list, but realistically looking at the first half of their schedule and all of the inexperience on the lines and it was hard to figure they'd be more than 2-4 at this point.

<br /><br /><br />

<strong>8. Texas A&M defense:</strong> This is the second year in Tim DeRuyter's system, but even without the great Von Miller, things have been a lot shakier for the Aggies than most would've expected. A&M suffered consecutive second-half collapses against Oklahoma State and Arkansas, where the Aggies gave up almost 1000 yards or passing. A&M was able to stop the losing streak at Texas Tech last weekend, but still got shredded for 40 points. They are dead last in pass defense and close to that in turnover margin (104th).

<br /><br />

<strong>9. Boston College:</strong> The Eagles (1-5) have one of the best players in college football in LB Luke Kuechly but the rest of the team is simply not producing. Their lone win was over FCS UMass. BC has lost three home games to Northwestern, Duke and Wake Forest. And the schedule hasn't really started to get into the toughest part for them yet.

<br /><br />

<strong>10. Minnesota:</strong> It has been a trying year for the Gophers. First-year head coach Jerry Kill has battled health issues, but after a respectable close loss at USC in the opener, it's been one dreadful performance after another for this team. The Gophers lost at home to New Mexico State, a team that has a hard time beating anyone that isn't New Mexico. Then, Minnesota lost to North Dakota State and been outscored by Michigan and Purdue 103-17 the past two weeks. A 1-11 season looks likely.

Posted on: September 30, 2011 12:25 pm
 

The Mailbag returns: RG3's Heisman hopes

Before I joined CBS, I had a regular Friday mailbag each week. I'm resuming that here. Send your college football questions to me via Twitter @BFeldmanCBS.
 
From @GoBearsGo95 how many wins would Baylor need for RG3 to win the heisman.
 

Griffin has taken over my top spot in the too-early Heisman rankings after his spectacular first month, throwing 13 TDs and 0 INTs. The most impressive part is that he has actually thrown more touchdowns than incompletions (12). That is staggering. Even more jaw-dropping is that this is a guy who came to Baylor known primarily for his World Class speed, not is passing skills. There is no way, he can keep that ridiculous pace up, but given the way he lit up well-respected Gary Patterson's D on national TV in the opening week, Griffin has gotten off to the start he needs to at least get invited to NYC for the ceremony.

Then again, last year, around this same time, I didn't think Cam Newton could sustain his fantastic pace for a whole season, and he did. Not only that, Newton actually got better as the pressure increased. Newton, though, also had a better supporting cast and arguably the top impact defender on his team too (Nick Fairley). 

Baylor needs to win at least 10 games for Griffin to have any shot at overtaking Andrew Luck and Kellen Moore, who are established favorites by now. The Bears have four "national stage" kinds of games remaining: at Texas A&M, Oct. 15; at Oklahoma State, Oct. 29; Oklahoma, Nov. 19 and then against Texas, Dec. 3. I think Baylor needs to win at least three of those to really have a good chance to win it.


From @RealNick_OSU How do u think Ohio St will handle head coaching job over offseason assuming OSU loses a couple more games? Meyer?


Barring the Buckeyes running the table and going 13-1, I think it'll be tough for Luke Fickell to keep this job. I realize that is an incredibly high standard to accomplish, especially given the off-field circumstances, but with the prospect of Urban Meyer, a former OSU assistant who has won two BCS titles out there, if Ohio State can get him, they almost have to go for him. 


Meyer wrote about his affinity for the Buckeye coaching job in his book a few years ago. I suspect at some point the pull of getting back into coaching is going to be too strong. And plum jobs don't come open very often. Certainly not this sweet of a gig, especially for a guy who once coached there. I'll say this I have been very impressed by Meyer as a game analyst. He is insightful and way ahead of the game. I really thought he and Chris Spielman did a terrific job last week during the ND-Pitt game, but I still can't see him, as the competitor he is, not being too wired to get back in the mix. 

From @whetherPROOF chances UF knocks off Saban in the swamp saturday?
 
 

I'll give it 20 percent. Anytime you have blazing speed, like the Gators do, and a talented D-line, like the Gators do, you have a shot. The problem is Alabama's D is so much bigger, more physical and well-coached than anything else UF has seen so far. I don't see UF being able to exploit mismatches the way they could in past games this year. Also, the Tide's O-line is very good and should be able to provide room for Trent Richardson and Eddie Lacy and the big-game experience will pay off for Bama here.

From @andrewltyler Will Texas Tech's streak of bowl games attended be coming to an end this year?

Nope, look for Tech to go bowling again. The Red Raiders really don't play anyone of note till Oct. 8 vs. Texas A&M, but these wins still count. Seth Doege is a good QB and he has some pretty good weapons around him. Assuming they win at KU, which I suspect they will, they just need to find two more Ws and I think they can get that with home games against Iowa State, K-State and Baylor in Arlington.


From @2xQuickDJ  if UW QB Price wins at Utah, does the national press start looking N of Palo Alto?

I like Keith Price a lot. He is playing better than I believe many expected he would, although when I spoke to Steve Sarkisian in August, he was very, very high on him.

Quite frankly, the national media really isn't focused on Washington, though. Losing at Nebraska, 51-38 didn't help and wining at unranked Utah won't really help change that. Now, about a month from today, U-Dub plays at Stanford, if the Huskies can win there, that will get people's attention around the country.
 

From @gregbranscum Is Mike Leach interested in UK if a coaching change should happen?

For starters, I don't see UK coming open any time soon. Joker Phillips just took over. He got UK to a bowl game in year one. The 2010 season wasn't a disaster. Remember this is still a Kentucky program that has averaged five wins over the past 10 years. They're 2-2 with an outside shot to qualify for a bowl game again. Even if they don't go bowling, you have to give the guy at least four years unless it is a complete disaster with issues on and off the field. There are going to be growing pains especially when you have a first-time head coach learning at a high level.
  As for Leach, I know his family really liked Lexington, but as I said, I don't see this job coming open in 2011.

From @Jon_Roser  is Memphis the worst team ever?

Wow, does it feel like things are that awful in Memphis that it has come to this? Well, I guess so. Although Howard Schnellenberger's final season at FAU might produce an even worse squad. The Owls are 0-3, but in fairness they have faced three good teams and only lost 30-14 at Auburn after trailing just 10-6 at halftime. They are at the bottom or almost at the bottom in rushing offense, passing offense and scoring. They aren't too much better on D either (112th). But at least now their schedule eases up quite  a bit.

Other teams Memphis is rivaling in futility:  New Mexico State 2005: 0-12 although the Aggies lost one in double OT to Idaho and fell by three to Utah State in the finale. 

FIU 2006 (0-12): The year before Mario Cristobal arrived, FIU scored 23 points over the final six games, but they did lose their first two games by one point each and dropped a 7 OT game to North Texas. They were a TD underdog or less in  five games and ended up losing four of those by double-digits  and three by 25 or more. 

But my pick for the worst of recent history is Temple, 2005 (0-11). The Owls lost games by 65 (Wisconsin); 63 (Bowling Green); and 48 (UVa). Aside from a 3-point loss to WMU, the Owls didn't come within 20 of any other opponent. 

This Memphis team has looked terrible and Larry Porter is presiding over one of those "disasters" I spoke about above. To lose by 44 at Arkansas State, not Arkansas, but Arkansas State is disturbing. It's one thing for a young coach to go 1-11, as it seems like this team will do again, but it's another to get blown out of the building. The defense has been really bad and their offense has been so much worse than that.

Short of them winning against UAB in mid-November, I don't see anything better than 1-11 although by that game my hunch is Porter probably won't be coaching the Tigers any more.
 
 
 
 
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